ICSM Records

MARTIN GEORGIEV:  GENESIS

TATIANA KOLEVA (MARIMBA), BULGARIAN NATIONAL RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, MARTIN GEORGIEV (CONDUCTOR)

Martin Georgiev: GenesisIt goes without saying that vocal music speaks of God and the world. However, wordless music can also speak. It is a sonic sign language. Someone who understands its characters, signals and symbols can also detect meaning and significance which elude mere structural analysis. To trace these, it is helpful if the composer gives at least an indication in the title (Johann Kuhnau: Biblische Historien (Biblical Histories), Robert Schumann: Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Richard Strauss: Tod und Verklärung (Death and Transfiguration).     More >>

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ACOUSTIC VERSION:  TIME IN TIME OUT

ANTHONY DONCHEV (PIANO), HRISTO YOTSOV (DRUMS, VIBES), GEORGE DONCHEV (BASS)

Acoustic Version:  Time In Time OutThis recording is a classic album because of the natural flow of the music and the extraordinary empathy between Hristo Yotsov and the Donchev brothers, Anthony and George. Acoustic Version has always been about the musical synergy and chemistry between the players. Their classical training and cultural background have determined a style impossible to define. Certainly there are elements of Bulgarian folklore — treated in a “urban” way — European classical music heritage of chamber music making, and experimental contemporary jazz.     More >>

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BRAHMS ON THE PIANO - VOLUME 3

JOZEF LUPTÁK (CELLO), IVO VARBANOV (PIANO)

Brahms on the Piano - Volume 3Johannes Brahms often consolidated his mastery of freshly explored domains by writing two examples in a specific genre in quick succession. His output consequently features such complementary couplings as the Piano Quartets nos. 1 and 2, (Op.25 and 26), the String Quartets Op.51 nos.1 and 2, the Clarinet Trio Op.114 and Clarinet Quintet Op.115, Six Piano Pieces Op118 and Four Piano Pieces Op.119 and, in the field of orchestral music, the Academic Festival Overture Op.80 and Tragic Overture Op.81. A notable exception to this trend is provided by the two sonatas for cello, which are separated by some 21 years and reflect the composer’s changing circumstances: the first is the product of a young man serving notice of his scholarship and maturity, while the second is the work of an older man writing at the peak of his powers with remarkable vigour and intensity.     More >>

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